An 11-year-boy on probation for participating in Arab spring *Christians defend Buddhist professor after he receives death threats

July 7, 2012 by  
Filed under newsletter-asia

Manama, July 06, 2012: For a juvenile court, Ali Hasan is a danger to society and must be re-educated, but does not say what offences he might have committed. Arrested in May, the boy has already spent a month in jail.

A Bahraini juvenile court ruled yesterday that 11-year-old Ali Hasan (pictured), accused of taking part in Arab spring-related anti-government protests on 13 May, will remain on probation because he represents a threat to society and must be re-educated. The case has caused outrage in the small country as well as abroad. Activists accuse the government of using Hasan’s case to stifle pro-democracy protests that began in March 2011 with dozens of dead.

Hasan was detained in May without specific charges. The court found him innocent and released him on 11 June. Yesterday, his case was reviewed and the judges decided he must be monitored for a year because he was dangerous, having taken part in three sit-ins organised by Shia activists in May.

“The decision today condemns him indirectly,” said Shahzalan Khamis, Hasan’s lawyer. “I am not happy with the decision. This boy is innocent and did not commit a crime.”

Asked about their judgement, the judges said the charges against the boy had not been dropped; however, they did not say whether he had been formally found guilty of any crime for which he would be monitored for a year.

Hasan is but one underage protester arrested during protests and sit-ins. According to the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, most of them were in the streets with their parents and without them would not have engaged in any action warranting arrest and detention.

Bahrain has a Shia majority, but is governed by a Sunni royal family allied to the Saudi Arabia. For more than a year, people have been calling for constitutional reforms and the removal of Sheikh Khalifah ibn Salman al-Khalifah, head of the government since 1971.

Following the start of the Arab spring, Bahrain’s Shia opposition organised a popular uprising. The government responded by calling for Saudi help, which came in the form of special forces authorised to fire on demonstrators. The clashes that ensued left 24 people dead, including four police officers.

Unrest resumed on 18 April 2012 in connection with the Formula One Grand Prize. For days, thousands of demonstrators occupied the streets of the capital and predominantly Shia villages.

The government responded with a crackdown, imposing a curfew and arresting hundreds.

– asianews

Christians defend Buddhist professor after he receives death threats

 

Sri Lanka, July 06, 2012: Nirmal Ranjith Devasiri, president of the Federation of University Teachers’ Association (FUTA), criticised the government’s education policy. Persons unknown threatened him. The Christian Solidarity Movement (CSM) called on President Mahinda Rajapaksa to guarantee freedom of expression and freedom of thought to all citizens.

Lay and religious Christian activists have called on Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa to protect the life of Nirmal Ranjith Devasiri (pictured), a Buddhist and a senior lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Colombo as well as president of the Federation of University Teachers’ Association (FUTA). In the past few days, he has received threatening phone calls and death threats from persons unknown for criticising government funding of education.

The Christian Solidarity Movement (CSM) wants an official inquiry in recognition that “the free expression of thoughts and freedom of involvement in trade union activities are fundamental rights guaranteed by the constitution in Sri Lanka and human rights charter of the United Nations.”

Prof Devasiri is politically involved. He has criticised the government, demanding that 6 per cent of GDP be invested in education. He has also called for better wages for university lecturer and their participation in committees making decision in the education field.

Since he and his colleagues organised a strike, he and his family have received threats from strangers.

“In view of recent cases of abductions and disappearances, the threats against Prof Devasiri worry us,” the CSM said.

“The government cannot allow such things. It must promote freedom of thought and freedom of expression, which are fundamental principles in every democracy. Failure to do so means that the government is against democracy.”

– asianews

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