Barnabas briefs: Iran, Afghan & Egypt persecution

December 22, 2013 by  
Filed under newsletter-world, Persecution

IRAN: CHURCH LEADER ON DIALYSIS SENTENCED TO THREE-AND-A-HALF YEARS IN JAIL

Iran: church leader on dialysis sentenced to three-and-a-half years in jailA seriously ill church leader who requires dialysis three times a week has been sentenced to three and a half years in jail.

The Rev. Vruir Avanessian (61), who also has serious heart disease and diabetes, was found guilty of anti-government activities and promotion of ideas contrary to the Islamic Republic ofIran: euphemisms for his Christian ministry.

He was arrested during a raid on a Christmas house church gathering in Tehran on 27 December 2012.

Mr Avanessian is a well-known Christian musician in Iran. He was a pastor in the Assemblies of God Church for 17 years before ill health forced him to retire from full-time ministry.

AFGHAN CONVERT THREATENED WITH DEATH FACING DEPORTATION FROM NETHERLANDS

Christians in AfghanistanAn Afghan convert from Islam to Christianity is facing deportation from the Netherlands after his asylum application was rejected.
Mostafa Najafi, who became a Christian around nine months ago, had to flee Afghanistanafter he was threatened with death – even by his own father – because of his conversion.

Apostasy, leaving Islam, is judicially punishable by death in Afghanistan. Earlier this year,Afghan MPs called in parliament for all converts to Christianity to be killed, in accordance with sharia law.

Mostafa would clearly be in great danger if he was returned to his homeland. But neither is he safe at the immigration camp in the Netherlands; he has been threatened by hard-line Muslims who are also being held there.

EGYPT: THREE CHRISTIANS JAILED FOR MUSLIM DEATH; NO-ONE CHARGED FOR FIVE CHRISTIAN DEATHS

Egypt ChristiansEgyptian Christians have criticised prison sentences issued in connection with an outbreak of violence against their community.

On Sunday (15 December), three Christians were jailed – one for 25 years, the other two for 15 years – for the death of a Muslim, while no-one has even been charged over the deaths of five Christians. At least six Muslims were convicted of vandalising churches and Christian property, and each jailed for either three or five years.

The case relates to an attack on the Christian community in al-Khosous in April. It was the worst outbreak of anti-Christian violence during the presidency of the Islamist Mohammad Morsi.

Beshoy Tamry of the Maspero Youth Union, a Christian activist group, said it was hoped that Christians would receive more equitable treatment following Morsi’s removal, adding, “But today proved that nothing changed. The regime has not changed its system of using the judiciary against Christians.”

– barnabas team

Enter Google AdSense Code Here

Comments are closed.